Understanding what makes Tennessee whiskey unique

Research being presented at the American Chemical Society's Spring 2019 meeting sheds light on the effect of the Lincoln County process on the flavor and aroma of Tennessee whiskey.

Research being presented at the American Chemical Society’s Spring 2019 meeting sheds light on the effect of the Lincoln County process on the flavor and aroma of Tennessee whiskey. Freshly distilled whiskey is filtered over sugar maple charcoal in a step known as the Lincoln County Process. In addition to being made in Tennessee, the Lincoln County Process is required for a whiskey to be classified as Tennessee Whiskey. (with one exception – Prichard’s Distillery is not required to use the Lincoln County process) Researchers from the University of Tennessee have found a significant change in the levels of some of the aroma active compounds after the charcoal filtration, and now say they have some clues as to what the process imparts to the final product.  If you want to go straight to the source, you can check out the abstract of the presentation here: Changes in key odorants by the Lincoln County process (Tennessee whiskey)  You can also read more of the  story at ScienceDaily. 

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